Adult Guardianship and Trusteeship

If, by some misfortune, you become incapable of managing your affairs, someone else must take on that responsibility. You can prepare for that possibility in advance by making legal documents (Personal Directive and Power of Attorney) that assign someone to handle these decisions. If you have not made these documents, someone will have to be assigned by the court to manage your affairs.

In Alberta, the Adult Guardianship and Trusteeship Act (AGTA) describes the process for doing this. In addition, if you are losing some decision-making ability, but are not completely incapable, this Act describes some other options for assistance with decisions.

The resources on this page were hand-picked by the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta's team of librarians as a good place to start.
For further resources on this topic and related documents, see the following keywords:
Guardianship and trusteeshipWills and estates


Suggested Resources

Adult Guardianship and Trusteeship

This online resource from Alberta Seniors and Community Supports provides information about the Adult Guardianship and Trusteeship Act (AGTA) which came into force on October 30, 2009. It includes information about the various decision-making options under the Act, and has sections specifically for private guardians, service providers and legal professionals. There is also a roster of designated capacity assessors. Related keywords: Guardianship and trusteeship (30)

Adult Guardianship and Trusteeship Act in Alberta

This booklet produced by the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta is for people who either: find themselves, or a loved one, in a state of diminished mental capacity and are interested in exploring joint decision-making options; or have a loved one who has lost capacity and must set up Guardianship and Trusteeship for that person. This 32 page PDF is available for download. Related keywords: Guardianship and trusteeship (30), Wills and estates (74)

Office of the Public Guardian (Alberta)

The Office of the Public Guardian (OPG) provides decision-making mechanisms for individuals who are unable to make personal, non-financial decisions for themselves. The OPG does this through the Personal Directives Act, the Adult Guardianship and Trusteeship Act and the Mental Health Act. The OPG also administers the Personal Directives Registry and the Adult Guardianship and Trusteeship Registry. Related keywords: Guardianship and trusteeship (30)

Office of the Public Trustee (Alberta)

The Office of the Public Trustee exists to protect and administer the property of represented adults, minor children, and deceased persons, where there is no one else able to act. The website provides information about trusteeship under the Alberta Guardianship and Trusteeship Act and about informal trusteeship. Related keywords: Guardianship and trusteeship (30), Wills and estates (74)

Speak up: Start the conversation about end-of-life care

Advance care planning is a process of reflection and communication, a time for you to reflect on your values and wishes, and to let others know your future health and personal care preferences in the event that you become incapable of consenting to or refusing treatment or other care. This website will help you to create an advance care plan that will document your wishes to be followed in the event you cannot speak for yourself. This website also gives information to caregivers, family, and friends helping to create an advance care plan for you. There is a Tool kit for community organizations; ACP planning resources; and Workbooks for all jurisdictions. Related keywords: Guardianship and trusteeship (30), Wills and estates (74)