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Self-representation

A total of 40 records were found for Self-representation
Definition:

Acting on one's own behalf in court, without the assistance of a lawyer or other advocate.


CPLEA has created new resources on Family Law in Alberta in partnership with the Edmonton Community Legal Centre. The five booklets in the series provide practical legal information on Child Custody and ParentingFinancial SupportProperty Division, Representing Yourself in Family Court, and Young Parents. The booklets can be downloaded for free at www.cplea.ca/publications. Select Family Law from the drop down menu.

Related keywords: Child support, Custody and access, Divorce and separation, Family law general resources, Guardianship and trusteeship, Self-representation

Ann Sherman presented her research on self represented litigants, entitled "A Study of Self Represented Litigants in the Supreme Court of Prince Edward Island" at CLIA's 2008 Annual General Meeting. The executive summary is posted and the full report is available in PDF format.
Related keywords: Research reports and institutes, Self-representation

  Ann Sherman presented her research on self represented litigants, entitled "A Study of Self Represented Litigants in the Supreme Court of Prince Edward Island" at CLIA's 2008 Annual General Meeting. The executive summary is posted and the full report is available in PDF format.  Related keywords: Research reports and institutes (75)

 

Related keywords: Research reports and institutes, Self-representation

The "Civil Matters: What to Do in Court" video provides tips and information on how to prepare for a Civil Claims trial if you are a Plaintiff, Defendant or Witness, including what documents you may need, how to present evidence, and how to address the judge. Video Transcripts are available in:  English | Spanish | French | Arabic | Hindi | Punjabi | Urdu

Related keywords: Civil actions, Legal process, Self-representation

  Report published was by Department of Justice Canada in 2003. It provides information on the extend of self-representation, the impacts on the acccused, and means of improving the access to information for self-represented litigants. Data collected from 9 court sites, including Edmonton (PDF - 51 pages).  Related keywords: Research reports and institutes (75)

 

Related keywords: Research reports and institutes, Self-representation

This tipsheet give an outline of how to tell if the legal information you are looking at is jurisdictionally correct, up-to-date, and provided by a reliable source,

Related keywords: Legal research, Self-representation

This tipsheet is a publication of the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta. It looks at the key differences between providing legal information vs. legal advice.

Related keywords: Self-representation

This pamphlet from the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta explains some basic points about the Alberta Rules of Court. It may assist you if: you have a legal problem and are looking at your options; you are deciding whether to hire a lawyer or represent yourself; you are already representing yourself; or you have questions for your lawyer about the court process. The Alberta Rules of Court apply to the Court of Queen’s Bench of Alberta. They do not apply in Provincial Court (Small Claims Court). This 2 page full-colour PDF is available for free download.

Related keywords: Civil actions, Legal process, Self-representation

Alberta Resources

An instructional video from the Canadian Bar Association Alberta branch demonstrates the basics of procedure in civil court for non-lawyers. It is about 25 minutes in length, and uses common types of courtroom disputes to explain the kinds of evidence you may need for your case as well as how to organize and present that evidence to the judge.

Related keywords: Courts and court judgments, Self-representation

Family Justice Services are a group of programs and services offered by Alberta Justice in collaboration with the courts of Alberta. This webpage provides general information for those who are representing themselves in a family matter in either Court of Queen's Bench or The Provincial Court of Alberta. Family Law includes all of the legal issues that arise when couples separate or when parties are parenting children together. Family Law does not include criminal charges against a family member, or issues that arise when a family member dies. This site provides general information only.

Related keywords: Adoption, Custody and access, Divorce and separation, Family law general resources, Self-representation, Spousal support

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