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Legal process

A total of 82 records were found for Legal process
Definition: The procedures for taking a dispute to court or other legal agency.

Canada/Federal

In Canada, each of us has a part in ensuring that the law works properly and that justice is done. Two ways of contributing to justice in Canada are being on a jury and testifying in court. This information covers the role of the public in the jury process,

Related keywords: Juries, Legal process

The publication of these guidelines received the endorsement of the Canadian Judicial Council. For the jury to follow and apply the guidelines, they must be clear, complete and accurate. A directive model meets these objectives. However, the existence of model guidelines does not mean that there is only one way to instruct a jury on a given topic. A model directive aims to convey essential information that should be provided to a jury in a simple, understandable and correct language. These guidelines provide an example of how this can be done.

Related keywords: Judges, Juries, Legal process

The National Self-Represented Litigants Project (NSRLP) is committed to advancing understanding of the challenges and hard choices facing the very large numbers of Canadians who come to court without counsel. The Project works to promote dialogue and collaboration among all those affected by the self-represented litigant phenomenon, both justice system professionals and litigants themselves. They publish resources designed specifically for SRLs, as well as research reports that examine the implications for the justice system.

Related keywords: Legal process, Legal research

This section describes in general terms the court system in Canada, that is to say, the different types and levels of courts, as well as their responsibilities. This is not a guide for people who come before the courts. For information on the justice system as a whole, we recommend consulting the section  The justice system of Canada .

Related keywords: Legal process

This portal provides information and instructions on what is expected of you when you bring your own application for leave to appeal or when you have been named as a respondent on an application for leave to appeal. An application for leave to appeal is a document by which a party requests leave to be heard by the Supreme Court of Canada in an appeal from a judgment of a court of appeal. Visit this website for more information and instructions.

Related keywords: Legal process, Self-representation

This article from the law firm Pringle Chivers Sparks explains how a judge decides on a sentence, discusses various types of sentences and describes other kinds of orders a judge may make after sentencing.

Related keywords: Criminal law general resources, Judges, Legal process

The Canada Agricultural Review Tribunal is an independent tribunal established by the Government of Canada to provide impartial reviews of notices of violation issued by federal agencies regulating agriculture and food.
Related keywords: Courts and court judgments, Legal process

This online resource from the Nova Scotia Public Prosecution Service takes you—step-by-step—through a Canadian criminal case. It explains the process clearly and simply and will help you to understand how a Canadian criminal prosecution works.

Related keywords: Criminal law general resources, Legal process

Created by the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta and made available on LawCentral Schools, the first part of this narrated powerpoint focused on Canadian law presents information on how the legal structure of Canada is organized, the history of our laws and an explanation of the Rule of Law.   The second part discusses legislation including who makes it, how it is made and how it is enforced.  It discusses the 3 levels of government that make laws, with the laws being made according to each government's responsibilities. The last part of the presentation focuses on Common Law and what it is, how it is made and how it is enforced.

Related keywords: Administration of justice, Classroom materials, Legal history, Legal process

The site is the first Canadian student program to be conceived, designed and produced by judges. It is a multimedia educational program designed for integration into high school social studies, civics and law courses. It introduces students to the role of judges within our judicial system, and encourages exploration of important concepts such as the rule of law, judicial independence and judicial impartiality. The site is made up of three compenents - a teacher's guide, a resource website for teachers and an online interactive program for students.

Related keywords: Classroom materials, Judges, Legal process

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